Advertised as a beat-em-up, Fate/Extella does just that and nothing else

Advertised as a beat-em-up,
Fate/Extella does just that and nothing else

VIDEO GAME REVIEW
Fate/Extella: The Umbral Star
Nintendo Switch

By Alexander O. Cuaycong and Anthony L. Cuaycong

The Fate series has always had its foot half in and half out of Western markets. Fate/Stay Night and its sequel Hollow Ataraxia never received an official English translation, their commercial success in Japan notwithstanding. Such is also the case with Fate Tiger Colosseum and Fate CCC and various other light novels and stories. That said, Type-Moon seems more than eager to reach its audiences beyond the Land of the Rising Sun. From Fate/Unlimited Codes’ release in 2009, to Fate/Extra in 2011, to even Fate/Grand Order on Android and iOS this year, the noted developer is taking steps to satisfy its English-speaking fans in the West.

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Fate/Extella does just that and nothing else”

Small town on the big screen

DVD Review
Some Came Running
Directed by Vincente Minnelli

By Noel Vera

(Warning: plot twists and narrative discussed in detail)

Vincente Minnelli’s Some Came Running (adapted from the James Jones novel) is often called an expose of the hypocrisies of small-town life and certainly there’s plenty on display: Dave Hirsh (Frank Sinatra) finds himself on a bus to his home town where he’s met by estranged brother Frank (Arthur Kennedy). Frank — a savvy businessman who runs his wife’s jewelry store and a savings & loan — recognizes the problem and opportunity Dave represents: a minor celebrity who’s written two interesting if commercially unsuccessful books (Frank’s friends the French’s insist on meeting him), but also a wild card (first night in town Dave is arrested for drunken brawling). Frank’s solution? Why modulate (come to Dave’s hotel room for a talk resembling both an interrogation and a counseling session), domesticate (invite him into the Hirsh home), assimilate (pair him off with the French’s daughter Gwen [Martha Hyer]).

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